mortisia:

― William Styron, Conversations with William Styron
mortisia:

― William Styron, Conversations with William Styron

mortisia:

William Styron, Conversations with William Styron

(via thisisaadl)

826chi:

Hi-res »
Heeding the advice of everyone from Aristotle and Napoleon to Tom Cruise and a handful of hypothetical textbook characters, Suzanne Buffam takes on the prospect of motherhood in “Trying”—our sixth selection for Read This Poem—as chosen by Srikanth Reddy. 826chi:

Hi-res »
Heeding the advice of everyone from Aristotle and Napoleon to Tom Cruise and a handful of hypothetical textbook characters, Suzanne Buffam takes on the prospect of motherhood in “Trying”—our sixth selection for Read This Poem—as chosen by Srikanth Reddy. 826chi:

Hi-res »
Heeding the advice of everyone from Aristotle and Napoleon to Tom Cruise and a handful of hypothetical textbook characters, Suzanne Buffam takes on the prospect of motherhood in “Trying”—our sixth selection for Read This Poem—as chosen by Srikanth Reddy. 826chi:

Hi-res »
Heeding the advice of everyone from Aristotle and Napoleon to Tom Cruise and a handful of hypothetical textbook characters, Suzanne Buffam takes on the prospect of motherhood in “Trying”—our sixth selection for Read This Poem—as chosen by Srikanth Reddy. 826chi:

Hi-res »
Heeding the advice of everyone from Aristotle and Napoleon to Tom Cruise and a handful of hypothetical textbook characters, Suzanne Buffam takes on the prospect of motherhood in “Trying”—our sixth selection for Read This Poem—as chosen by Srikanth Reddy. 826chi:

Hi-res »
Heeding the advice of everyone from Aristotle and Napoleon to Tom Cruise and a handful of hypothetical textbook characters, Suzanne Buffam takes on the prospect of motherhood in “Trying”—our sixth selection for Read This Poem—as chosen by Srikanth Reddy. 826chi:

Hi-res »
Heeding the advice of everyone from Aristotle and Napoleon to Tom Cruise and a handful of hypothetical textbook characters, Suzanne Buffam takes on the prospect of motherhood in “Trying”—our sixth selection for Read This Poem—as chosen by Srikanth Reddy. 826chi:

Hi-res »
Heeding the advice of everyone from Aristotle and Napoleon to Tom Cruise and a handful of hypothetical textbook characters, Suzanne Buffam takes on the prospect of motherhood in “Trying”—our sixth selection for Read This Poem—as chosen by Srikanth Reddy.

826chi:

Hi-res »

Heeding the advice of everyone from Aristotle and Napoleon to Tom Cruise and a handful of hypothetical textbook characters, Suzanne Buffam takes on the prospect of motherhood in “Trying”our sixth selection for Read This Poemas chosen by Srikanth Reddy.

wildwildwhatever:

Lynn Xu, Mary Hickman, Joshua Edwards, Robert Fernandez: Counterpath, Denver, Colorado, 2/20/14.

dianaarterian:

Had such a lovely time reading with Lynn Xu and Joshua Edwards yesterday at the inaugural Non-Standard Lit Reading Series event in San Diego! (photos via Adam Stutz) dianaarterian:

Had such a lovely time reading with Lynn Xu and Joshua Edwards yesterday at the inaugural Non-Standard Lit Reading Series event in San Diego! (photos via Adam Stutz) dianaarterian:

Had such a lovely time reading with Lynn Xu and Joshua Edwards yesterday at the inaugural Non-Standard Lit Reading Series event in San Diego! (photos via Adam Stutz)

dianaarterian:

Had such a lovely time reading with Lynn Xu and Joshua Edwards yesterday at the inaugural Non-Standard Lit Reading Series event in San Diego! 

(photos via Adam Stutz)

hafsanm:

“I know kung fu.” It won’t bring back the world.
5:15 a.m.: I wake from another dream,
the same as every dream. A man builds a ship
in my chest. Each of the sailors
carries by her breast a picture of her sister.
The ship is not the image of a ship.
Beyond its sails there are no stars.
The…

“No matter how convinced I am by the image of myself in weakness leaking from the stronghold of my demonic persuasion, there is simply a promise and that I must keep to myself.”
— “News,” Great Guns, Farnoosh Fathi (via carrieabigstick)

lunch-poems:

by Emmanuel Hocquard

Abstract machines
of waves. It
breaks without contour
or memory. When one speaks
of water, subject and object
form in the phrases.
The mimosa flowers
between December and March,
the stream flows,
etc. simply said for the gesture
of saying words. There is
an abyss. Poetry

berfrois:

Fire blazes the best path to the dead, to the forlorn solos—
let no tuber rebut. And Otis letters by the cartload get gutted,
mercifully, mercifully.
Yet, later, while kayaking with a postal inspector,
I was informed that the deified Dead Letter Office was dead.
To whom can the reviled deliver themselves now?
All the mail is posted and gone and there is so much letter left.

From “Sit on a Potato Pan, Otis" by Darcie Dennigan